Wednesday, February 10, 2021

Some Painted 3D Printed Fantasy

I've painted up some of my bigger 3D printed miniatures, just to see how badly the infamous FDM print lines will show up. The results have been a lot better than I expected, especially when I did some surface preparation before painting.

On the left is one of my 3D printed earth elementals that I showcased in a previous post. On the right is a D&D pre-primed miniature I had painted some time ago. For this particular earth elemental, I used Future floor wax on the surface to "fill" the print lines, then used white gesso to prime. After that, it was painting as usual. I think it turned out very well, and the print lines are not visible to any table-top level scrutiny.

I've painted up all four of my 3D printed earth elementals, including the one from above. These are all free files from Thingiverse, and are ultimately the same design posed in different ways. This is one of the strengths of 3D printing, where you can design and alter models to customize them.
For the other three earth elementals, I used a technique described by a user on the Miniatures Page, where you use varnish to fill in the print lines before priming. I'm not sure I see that much difference in print lines compared to the Future method, but they did require fewer coats.

The backs of these miniatures are also quite free of print lines, after the pre-paint treatment.

I'll be using these earth elementals as a another horde in Kings of War, probably still for my dwarf army. They are definitely serviceable compared to my other earth elemental miniatures.

I also printed and painted a generic fantasy minotaur, also free from Thingiverse. The design is pretty no-frills, but good enough after the varnish surface treatment and a quick paintjob.

Here it is compared to a Warhammer Fantasy figure. He's a pretty big guy, and I'll probably use him in smaller scale fantasy games like Frostgrave.

Now that I'm more confident about the quality of these miniatures, I'll be getting onto some more complicated models and the smaller cyberpunk characters I displayed before.





Sunday, January 24, 2021

Getting Deeper into Cyberpunk

Encouraged by my previous successes printing 28mm characters, I've printed even more, mainly aimed at a sci-fi/cyberpunk setting for use in Hardwired or Stargrave (when that comes out).
Back over Christmas break and around New Years, I took advantage of some sales to buy more STL files. There are quite a few talented artists, both on the free Thingiverse, and on the (mostly) paid MyMiniFactory.
A good source of figures is Titan Forge Miniatures, a store on MyMiniFactory. They have a good range of science fiction, fantasy, and post-apocalyptic figures. The above are their Cyber Force Marines unit. These come with separate torsos, legs, etc., that can be combined into different poses. I have a couple with rifles and one with two pistols above, and there are a lot more possibilities. They are a bit bigger than the Papsikels demo mini from before, being all in power armour. Titan Forge figures also come with useful textured 25mm or 32mm round bases, which I'm using above.

The dog with VR goggles and the cyberpunk "witch hunter" (who may look familiar) are from Papsikel's store on MyMiniFactory. The kid with the boomerang on the right is from Titan Forge's post-apocalyptic range. The witch hunter figure didn't come out as clean as I would have liked, so maybe I'll try another one. The dog came out perfectly since it needed very little support. The kid and the dog can make great NPCs or objectives in games. After all, no adventure is complete without a kid and a dog!

The Titan Forge "wild child" figure seems to be based on the feral kid with a boomerang from "The Road Warrior", although the helmet and hair remind me more of Newt from "Aliens". This miniature was so small and thin that I didn't think it would print on an FDM printer, but it turned out to be serviceable, although not perfect.

For "bounty hunter" type figures, the "sheriff" on the left is from Papsikels, and the thin guy with the "commie alien" type helmet on the right is from Titan Forge. The "sheriff" suffered a bad sanding incident on the front, and I may have to do another print.

For more of a horror flavour, I also bought a "stitchwork golem" from the wonderfully named Rocket Pig Games, also on MyMiniFactory. This is printed at around half size to be more of a human-sized figure, but it can be a giant monster too. I like the design, and it reminds me of the "boogie man" from "A Nightmare Before Christmas".

Don't worry, I have actually been painting miniatures too. In fact, I'm waiting for some recently-sanded bases to dry right now, and I should be able to put up some painted 3D printed figures soon.

Friday, January 8, 2021

New Year and Some More 3D Printing

I wish everyone a Happy New Year, and hopefully this will be a better year than the last one.

I've been playing with my 3D printer some more, and despite my point before about avoiding miniatures with my CR-6SE FDM printer, I tried some Cyberpunk characters for my two favourite scales.

This is the same file from Thingiverse here, by a talented artist with the moniker "Papsikels". His miniatures are done in a very fitting style, bulky enough to print with an FDM printer while still retaining excellent amounts of detail and proper human proportions.

I printed this miniature in two scales, 28mm on the left, and 1/72 scale on the right. Once again, they turned out to be much better than I hoped for an FDM printer.

This is the 28mm miniature next to a Games Workshop model on the left and a Reaper Bones model on the right. It's a good fit for 32mm "heroic" miniatures, which I think I'll use for the soon to be released Stargrave game.

This is the 1/72 scale miniature with respectively, Caesar modern French, Elhiem sci-fi Fed trooper, and Caesar modern special forces (with some mods) miniatures. To be honest, I didn't think this one would come out at this scale, but it turned out fine, but with a lot of excess stringing that I'll have to clean off.
These miniatures have encouraged me to experiment even more. Stay tuned!